Tilburg International Club

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Monthly Archives: February 2017

Upcoming Events

  • Book Club: Becoming 21 October 2019
  • Pumpkin Carving 26 October 2019
  • tícMovie Night 22 November 2019
  • Worstenbrood Workshop 26 November 2019

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News Archive

Open Position, Treasurer

vacant-chairInterested in becoming more actively involved in the #TilburgInternationalClub ? This is your chance! We are currently looking for a new Treasurer.

The Treasurer is a member of the TIC Board of Directors, and as such, is required to attend board meetings and present at the Annual General Meeting. This is a voluntary position and the board works closely together to provide support for all club functions, as needed.

As Treasurer, you would be a member of TIC’s Board taking care of the club’s financial matters, helping steer the direction of TIC’s events and activities, and of course, having a lot of fun while contributing  to Tilburg’s international community.

Treasurer

Responsibilities

  • Track funds received and spent for every club activity
  • Invoice and report on membership dues collected
  • Maintain accurate financial records throughout the club year
  • Pay bills and reimbursements promptly
  • Reconcile bank statements
  • Coordinate the club audit at the end of every year

Requirements

  • Ability to attend board meetings once every 4 – 6 weeks
  • Maintain event budget, expenses and payments
  • Present summary of club finances at the AGM
  • Knowledge of Microsoft Excel, Google Drive
  • Have fun!

Interested? Send us a note!

TICMovie Review: Lion

posterlionoscar01

by Anne van Oorschot

On Friday, February 3rd, we met at Cinecitta for a night at the movies. We seem to be in a period with many good and interesting films to choose from, but the one we went to was, Lion, surprisingly enough, not a nature film, but one that took place in both India and Australia.

The film tells the story of the Indian, Saroo, and his search to find his home. While it sounds pretty straight forward, nothing could be less true! As a 5 year old child from rural India, Saroo gets locked in a train that travels several days, finally stopping 16,000 kilometers later in busy Calcutta. Not knowing the Hindi language spoken in the city, unsure of the name of the small village from which he came, or even his Mother’s name (“Mama”), the authorities cannot help him get back home. While lion-1many dire things could have befallen Saroo, he is taken to an orphanage from which he is adopted by a loving Australian couple.

Once Saroo starts college, he starts having more and more memories of his real mother and brother, as well as the surroundings of his Indian home. With the aid of Google Earth, Saroo sets out on the seemingly impossible task of finding the Indian railway station from which he left 25 years earlier and from there, his way home.

lion-2The fact that the whole thing is a true story – proven by the photos of the actual people during the credits – is absolutely amazing. (After seeing 5 year old Saroo trying to find his way alone in Calcutta, I will never, ever complain about the difficulties of adjusting to life in Tilburg!) Add to a gripping story (the film has been nominated for 6 Oscars), there was also excellence in acting from Dev Patel who received the BAFTA for Best Actor in a Supporting Role.  7 TIC members, drinks and snacks after the film, and what do you get? A great start to the weekend!

A look back at the Christmas Cookie Workshop

by Sondra Grace

‘Twas ‘bout a week before Christmas when all thro’ Verhalenhuis

Not a creature wasn’t stirring in butter, pecans or muisjes;

The potholders were hung by the oven with care;

In hopes that the cookie doughs soon would be klaar;

When all was baked and nestled snug into tins,

Wine and music and friendship had we all to our zin

Visions of jam thumbprints and ting-a-lings danced in each head

We left ‘gainst a winter’s night, glove and scarf gekleed

And Anne in her apron, with smile tinsel bright, called

Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!

TIC Holiday Dinner

holiday-dinnerby Yolonda van Riel

On a blustery January evening, TIC kicked off 2017 with another great holiday dinner! This year’s dinner was held at de Visserij in the Puishaven. It was a little less formal than our previous holiday dinners but that was kind of the idea. We shared appetizers and drinks in the little café as we welcomed members old and new as well as several guests.

As we all got acquainted and reacquainted, we made our way into the restaurant where shared fish, quiche and an array of vegetables. It was served “family style” and it was a bit of a different experience than most of us were accustomed to. But it was quite fun! And with well over 20 people in attendance, it was great way to keep the conversation flowing and speak to everyone.

Afterwards, dessert and drinks were again shared by all in the café, where we continued sharing stories, catching up and making plans. Although, the dinner wasn’t as fancy as dinners past, the atmosphere was fantastic and allowed us to mix, mingle and chat with everyone. The bar was cozy, played nice music and provided the perfect backdrop to enjoy a cold winter’s evening with TIC friends.

Book Review: High Tide

high-tideby Victoria Vasjuta

Looking back at our first TIC Book Club meeting of 2017 makes me feel positive and enthusiastic exactly as it felt that night. The location was amazing and it was nice to see new people joining in a warm friendly atmosphere and, as always, it was great to have an interesting discussion.

The topic of this TIC Book Club was a modern Latvian novel High Tide written by Inga Ābele, born in 1972 in Riga. She has written plays and screenplays, collections of poetry, stories and novels. Her plays have been staged not only in Latvia, but also in Sweden and Germany.

I think we all agreed that High Tide: it’s a quite strange book that combines lush, provocative prose with a gripping plot about a love triangle and a murder. Although this plot is told in semi-reverse chronological order . . . so many moments start to make sense only at the end of the book. It’s like an anti-mystery novel, I suppose.

Although it wasn’t the most interesting book, we still had a great evening and enjoyed time together with tea, coffee and cookies in very special place, which was so nicely arranged by one of our fellow TIC members, Anita. @Anita, thank you for your warm and special welcome!

If you feel that you might need a community of enthusiastic readers of all ages, just come over and check it out. Maybe see you soon!

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