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Upcoming Events

  • Xmas Borrel 20 December 2019 at 7:30 pm – 12:00 am Café Bakker, Heuvel 44, Heuvel 45, 5038 CS Tilburg, Pays-Bas
  • Book Club: The Lost Girls of Paris 9 January 2020
  • tíc holiday dinner 11 January 2020 at 6:00 pm – 11:00 pm Anvers Brasserie & Beer Cafe, Oude Markt 8, 5038 TJ Tilburg, Pays-Bas

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News Archive

Reminder! Day trip to the Dordrecht Christmas Market

Date: Saturday, December 14th, 2019
Time: 11:10 at Tilburg train station (same train stops at Tilburg University at 11:22).
Location: Dordrecht
Register by: December 12
Member Cost: No cost to join; train ticket and lunch are not arranged by tic
Guests: same as for members.

Christmas time is on its way and tic would like to invite you on an afternoon trip to enjoy one of the largest Christmas Markets the Netherlands. We will go by train to the Christmas market in the beautiful, historical city center of Dordrecht.

Register Now! (more…)

Invitation: Day trip to the Dordrecht Christmas Market

Date: Saturday, 14 December 2019
Time: 11:10 at Tilburg train station (same train stops at Tilburg University at 11:22).
Location: Dordrecht
Register by: 12 December
Member Cost: No cost to join; train ticket and lunch are not arranged by tic
Guests: same as for members.

Christmas time is on its way and tic would like to invite you on an afternoon trip to enjoy one of the largest Christmas Markets the Netherlands. We will go by train to the Christmas market in the beautiful, historical city center of Dordrecht.

Register Now! (more…)

Review Day trip to Dickens Festival in Deventer

by Gleb Gertsman

16 December 2018. What is the first thing that comes to mind when you hear the name of Charles Dickens? The story of Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, The Pickwick Papers and, of course, A Christmas Carol novella. So, when a lot of characters from his work coming to life in a two-day festival, you just have to be there.

“There” is a town called Deventer, which is situated in the Overijssel province. The Dickens festival is always held in the winter, close to Christmas, and this year it fell on the weekend of 15-16 December.

We, tíc members, decided to go there, to check the atmosphere, try to name all the characters and to soak in the Christmas spirit of an English Victorian village.

The morning welcomed us with a white sheet of snow all over the Netherlands. It was cold, dark and mysterious, but we were ready for adventures, which began almost immediately.

Our train stopped midway and could not continue to the final destination, so we stopped in the small town of Oss to wait for another one to come for rescue. Foggy Oss welcomed us with hot drinks (thanks to Kiosk and NS) and we happily chatted with each other. The waiting time flew by and 30 minutes later we were sitting in the train on our way to a fairytale.

We knew, that there might be a waiting line of up to 60 minutes at the entrance to the old town of Deventer, but the hope was still within us. Therefore, it wasn’t surprising when we saw a bunch of people going in the same direction. The hope for a short waiting time evaporated. Thankfully, the clever people of Deventer helped us to overcome this small obstacle by dipping us gently in old days town mood.

Just as we got out of the central station, we found a photo booth in a shape of an old photo camera that was offering photography services. The fashion of the 19th century also came alive here. Women with puffed dresses, long sleeves, V-shaped bodices, and men with cutaway coats, straight trousers and high hats, we could see it all. The waiting time flew fast because we could drink Glühwein or hot chocolate, eat some hot waffles, and just enjoy the music of the orchestra playing next to us. But be aware, thieves are on a constant alert, and they will rob you shamelessly. If you don’t want to drink, then buy a newsletter from a paper boy, and read while you are waiting, because a guard with sharp spears will not let you in.

Finally, we made it to the entrance. A huge statue of Charles Dickens, made of lights, welcomed us into the wonderful and harsh world of his stories.

It seems that time just stopped here. The old city of Deventer was dressed in Christmas trees and festive lights, rich couples promenading next to us. Folk were doing their daily activities: cleaning, laundry and grazing sheep. Merchants were selling fruits, vegetables, warm chestnuts, waffles, cakes, artisan bread, smoked meat and fish from, oh so many, carts. Chimney sweepers were doing their dirty chores. The city was loud and alive.

We witnessed a fire, a robbery, a drunken brawl, a ghost predicting the future (or putting a curse on us, it was in Dutch). Oliver Twist was there too, telling us all about his adventures. The village police were trying to keep everything in order, but little children, begging for money, and drunk vagabonds, trying to pick up a fight with every passer-by, made our walk through the old town very realistic, fun and unexpected.

But not only were the streets full of tales, people opened their windows for us, and inside we saw tea parties, a real trial, and regular people just playing board games in Victorian living rooms.

It was cold outside, so the Dickens pub (pool salon during “regular” days) took us into its warm arms and gave us a hiatus to rest and eat before we continued the journey.

A lot of antique shops, different boutiques, Dickens museum, wood sawing, playground for little children and Scottish marching band made our day diverse.

Almost at the end of our day, we visited a church on the Bergkerkplein where we witnessed a children’s play, recreating scenes from A Christmas Carol novella.

We finished the day at the Christmas market of modern Deventer with some poffertjes.

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#tilburginternationalclub #expatlife #Deventer #DickensFestival #daytrip

Delicious treats from the Christmas Cookie Party!

by Alisha Z. (tícKid!)

08 Dec 2018. The cookie workshop was a lot of fun. There was lovely Christmas music in the background for decorating different Christmas themed cookies.

There were snacks and drinks for everyone. All the people that were there made beautiful cookies with all the icing that was self-made. We also had plenty of cookie decorations. (more…)

#TBT: Day Trip to Muenster Christmas Market

This weekend, tíc is taking a trip to the Dickens Festival in Deventer. In honour of #ThrowbackThursday, let’s take a look back at last year’s trip to the Christmas Market in Muenster, Germany.

x-x-x-x-x-x

by Andrew Kelly

10 December 2017. It has become a tradition that every year tíc takes a winter day trip and this year we chose to go to the wonderful German city of Muenster. Our meeting point was at Tilburg University where our bus was waiting to take us to Muenster. The bus was very comfortable and sharing Christmas cookies made the bus ride go a little more quickly.

Of course, once we arrived it started to snow and the city really started to get the Christmas spirt.

Let’s just say it was really cold and a lot of my time was spent drinking the hot Gluhwein in their traditional mugs and eating all the lovely food which I think added an extra 10kg to my weight.

Exploring the Classical city of Muenster in the snow was also an experience and I would recommend it to anyone if they enjoy taking a drive down to see the city.

#TBT: Canal ride and walking tour review

Throwback Thursday brings you a look at our boat and walking tour from this past October.

x–x–x–x–x–x–x–x–x

by Andrew Kelly

Being October, we decided to arrange a boat trip and nature walk as October means good weather, right? Well, as I have learned coming from northern Europe, that is not always the case.

The trip was split into two parts, the boat trip through the Piushaven Tilburg and then a nature walk through nature preserve Moerenburg.

This sunny afternoon started at the Doncurado Tilburg, which has the best coffee in all of Tilburg. At 14:00, the TIC group was picked up by our guide for the day Gert Brunink (owner of Mee Naar Buiten).

Walking from our meeting point to the boat, I would say the sky just opened up and then we discovered that there was no roof to the boat. But Gert was on hand with umbrellas! So, a little wet, we set off around the Piushaven.

The trip was great fun and we did learn a lot about the history of Tilburg and how in the past, the Piushaven was the life blood of the city. I will not go into too much detail because I feel I would not do it justice but if you are interested in knowing about the history of Tilburg I would defiantly invest a afternoon.

Then, as it always is, as soon as the boat docked, the rain stopped and Gert lead us on our nature walk through Moerenburg. This area is a natural swamp and was previously a water reservoir for Tilburg. But now, it is a quiet place to enjoy a stroll near the water and admire the many animals that are present.

We ended the tour at one of the most impressive attractions, the re-creation of the old land house. Much of the history of 
this building is lost but luckily, they are finding more info every day.

Tilburg is a place with lots to offer, including plenty for the nature enthusiasts. I would definitely recommend taking this tour.

#Expat #Tilburg #Piushaven #MeeNaarBuiten #tour

TIC’s day trip to The Hague

Anne van Oorschot knows her way around the Hague! This 13thcentury building survived the wrecking ball when … Down that way is a shop where, if you should every need a hat suitable for a posh wedding …  Today you will find in this unassuming Louis XIV building … The famous Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova died there in … So the king’s carriage passes under this gilded royal crest  …

The first stop of our in-depth visit was the Mauritshuis, once the stately residence of VOC sugar baron Johan Maurits van Nassau-Siegen, today an elegant little museum. The majestic stairway and panelled walls hung with Golden Age masterpieces make you want to lower your voice to a whisper. We had a chance to see more Jan Steen (whose work figured prominently in the TIC guest lecture “Saints and Sinners “ of a couple weeks ago). Steen was from a wealthy Catholic beer brewing family. A complicated man, his paintings pull back the curtain sometimes on rich 17thcentury interiors, sometimes on intimate domestic scenes, and sometimes on episodes of Burgers-behaving-badly.

We had lunch at Schlemmer, haunt of politicians, artists and theatre folk, that appears little changed since subway tiles were put on the walls around the turn of the century (the one before this one that is).  We sat at a plank table, in a decidedly gezellig corner, and had an oh-so-Dutch lunch of hot soup and boterham.

Next stop: Panorama Mesdag (which is nothing at all likethe rather decrepit panorama at Waterloo).  A tiny gallery lined with exquisite seascapes ended at upward spiralling steps. As we climbed we began to hear screeching gulls and lapping water; at the top we walked into the sunlight and found ourselves in a gazebo on top of a sand dune, and before us a 360 degree view of Scheveningen, fresh as the day it was painted in 1881 thanks to a ten-year restoration—glass top to sandy bottom.

We took a coffee break in the bright adjoining café, but time was a wastin’ and there was still one stop to go before closing time. We headed at a quick pace for the Peace Palace. One side of the reception center is almost fully glass, the gardens beyond green and quiet, on the other side it’s dusk-dark, a black and white film of momentous international events showing in a loop—this is why the world needs a place like this. I could almost hear Bob Dylan singing Blowing in the Wind; Yes, and how many years …?

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#Tilburg #Expats #expatlife #thehague #tour

Memory Lane: 2016 Christmas Cookie Workshop

Our 2017 Christmas Cookie workshop is just around the corner.  Here’s a quick look back at last year!

by Sondra Grace

‘Twas ‘bout a week before Christmas when all thro’ Verhalenhuis

Not a creature wasn’t stirring in butter, pecans or muisjes;

The potholders were hung by the oven with care;

In hopes that the cookie doughs soon would be klaar;

When all was baked and nestled snug into tins,

Wine and music and friendship had we all to our zin

Visions of jam thumbprints and ting-a-lings danced in each head

We left ‘gainst a winter’s night, glove and scarf gekleed

And Anne in her apron, with smile tinsel bright, called

Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!

Visit to Kaasboederij Leyedaeler (Cheese Farm)

Articles written, translated and photographed by TICKids!
Dutch version by Filipek Cizek

English version by Baruska Cizek
Photographs by Varunka Cizek

8 April 2017.  We went to a cheese farm for a tour. First, we could drink something: tea, coffee, raw milk from the cows or lemonade. While we were drinking, the farmer told us something about the farm and the cows: how many there are, how much milk he gets from them, when they are outside and when they are inside and how the cheese is made.

After this, we went outside to see the calves. There were three small calves in the “camping” for calves that are only one month (or less) old. Behind the “camping” were bigger calves. Then we went a little further to see the big cows. There were about 50 cows. Again, the farmer told us something about the cows and he showed us the leader of the cows: It was the only cow that had horns. There also were two cows that were fighting.

When the farmer was done explaining, we went back to the farm house and there we went upstairs to take a look at the cowshed. It was almost empty, because most of the cows were outside. The farmer said that the cows could freely walk around in the cowshed.

When we looked through another window, we could see a place where the cows get milked.

After taking a look in the cowshed, we went to see the last part of the farm: the part where the cheese is made. We could see the salt bath, the shelves where cheese ripens and a large barrel in which is milk when the cheese is made. We could also taste some cheese. There was also a shop on the farm where we could buy cheese and while the adults stayed in the shop, the children could go and milk a wooden cow which was fun. This was the last thing we did and then we went home.

It was a great day for everyone and I learnt a lot about the cows. The cheese we could taste was really good so we bought some to eat it at home.

Visit to Kessels Music Instrument Museum

by Andy Kelly

Living in Tilburg for the last 8 years, I had heard the story of Marietje Kessels, the poor 11 year old girl who was murdered in the Noordhoek church on August 22, 1900 with no one was brought to justice. The story I was told was that Marietje came from a rich factory owner’s house but I did not know her family business was the production of musical instruments. So, I thought it would be great to find out more about one of the most famous families from Tilburg.

The day started like all guests to the museum trying to find the entrance, I was glad to see Anne waiting for me at the entrance to the textile museum were she proceeded to show me how to get to the musical instrument factory. After going out the textile museum and up some stairs the group was brought into a little room, where tea, coffee and biscuits were served.

At this point, the curator introduced himself and began to tell the story of the factory and the Kessels family which I would find out go hand in hand. The museum is staffed by volunteers who love their work and it shows. An example of this was even though the curators English was not the best and sometimes he had to ask for the right word, he spoke with the passion of a man wanting to share his knowledge of a beloved hobby. So back to the tour, next on the agenda was a short film about the factory which turned out to be kind of an accident.

Mathijs Kessels, a man that worked in the sheet music industry and an accomplished composer, saw a market for his sheet music in an industrial town known as Tilburg. Due to the high levels industrialization, this brought something totally new to the lower class free time. The factory owners encouraged music playing within the lower-ranks as, in the words of the curator, playing a musical instrument was a lot better than sitting in the pub.

So, as with many things, Mathijs started a small printing house in Tilburg and for some reason, people started bringing their musical instruments to the printing house to have them fixed. And in true entrepreneurial fashion, he said, why not? Demand became so great for musical instrument repair that Mathijs decided to not only repair them but make them. He found a site outside of the city center (next to the big AH that is now a green field ) to build a grand house and a new factory. Business grew and his factory at one point could supply almost everything to kit out a full marching band.

As with most stories, what goes up must come down. Mathijs received a large order of 900 pianos that were made and delivered but for which were never paid. This caused the company to come close to bankruptcy at which point the bank stepped in and took control of the factory. This ended up with Mathijs being kicked out of his own factory and starting a competing factory right next door. In the long term, not a great idea as orders and invoicing were delivered to the old address. Matthijs passed away on the 21st of December 1932 and within 20 years, both the new and old musical instrument factories were out of business.

So with the film ending, we were led to the brass workshop and shown the many stages of producing brass instruments. Being a mechanical engineer, it did bring me back to my student days. We were really shown how the instruments were made and the exhibit had a great illustration of showing this step by step. Next on the agenda was the wood instruments assembly area which included a saxophone to my surprise…

Well I don’t want to spoil the rest of the museum but I can recommend a visit. Half the fun is finding the museum and, if you have an interest in music or manufacturing, you’ll definitely be in the right spot.

A look back at the Christmas Cookie Workshop

by Sondra Grace

‘Twas ‘bout a week before Christmas when all thro’ Verhalenhuis

Not a creature wasn’t stirring in butter, pecans or muisjes;

The potholders were hung by the oven with care;

In hopes that the cookie doughs soon would be klaar;

When all was baked and nestled snug into tins,

Wine and music and friendship had we all to our zin

Visions of jam thumbprints and ting-a-lings danced in each head

We left ‘gainst a winter’s night, glove and scarf gekleed

And Anne in her apron, with smile tinsel bright, called

Happy Christmas to all, and to all a good night!

A day trip to Valkenburg

valkenburg-10-12-12by Isabel Oriol

“It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas…everywhere you go”. I got that song going round and round in my head… So it was time to visit a Christmas market.

Saturday the 10th of December early in de morning I gathered together with other TIC members to go to Valkenburg “The Christmas Town of the Netherlands.” We were going to discover this town in the south of the Netherlands close to the rivier Geul and its’ famous Caves and Castle Ruins. The corridors of the caves acted as secret passageways to the Castle Ruins in the past.

In the bus, we had time to talk and get to know each other, and after an hour and a half we arrived in Valkenburg. At first we visited the “Fluwelengrot” (Velvet Cave), one of the oldest underground corridors in the Limburg Region.

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At this time of the year, there were many festive stalls which offered Christmas presents and gift items, but also clothing and personal care products. We were told the temperatures in the caves would be at a constant 22°C but… it was really around 12°C (or less brrrrr!)

Fortunately, some of us got a glass of Glühwein before the start of our cave tour. A nice Limbo man (someone from Limburg… that is what they call them in a funny way) offered us a free drink!

We were dressed accordingly to the weather, but in case you were not, you could also buy some warm clothing…woolen scarves, a nice hat, gloves in many colours, sweaters… To suit all tastes.

valkenburg-10-12-9After the cave tour we visited the town and climbed the Castle Ruins from the year 1050, the only elevated fortress in the Netherlands. We enjoyed the delightful view from the hilltop castle. The town is crowded, many queues everywhere…a lot of visitors from other regions and from Germany and Belgium, as well.

The larger group eventually got back together for a drink before we went back to Tilburg. It was a nice day and I enjoyed the conversations I had with all the members!

Wishing everyone a happy new year,

Isabel

013 Tour and AGM

Article by Anne van Oorschot

The fun activity connected to this year’s Annual General Meeting (AGM) on May 26th was a tour of Tilburg’s Pop and Dance Center – 013. Eleven TIC members met at 5:30 outside the door of  013 and enjoyed the beautiful weather, chatting while we waited. Gijs, an employee of 013, was our tour guide and told us a bit about  the pop club. Built in 1998, it was the first theater built expressly for pop music and attracts visitors from the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany and from further afield for some artists and festivals. After the renovations carried out in November 2015, 013 is larger and more leading than ever in the pop and dance scene. 013  is a club, and has an artistic agenda rather than a “for profit” mentality. The artists get the entrance fee charged for their performances, while 013’s income comes from modest subsidies and the sale of drinks at the venue. The recent renovation reduced the number of performance halls from 3 to 2, but both now have a larger capacity. While they are generally a “standing room only” venue, their spaces are sometimes rented out for events that require seating and it was strange to see their big hall all full of chairs! One of their most popular events is the Roadburn Festival (coming from April 20 – 23, 2017) and then it’s really hopping at 013!!  It was a fun opportunity to get a good look at all the “nooks and crannies” of this unique venue and fur to take a TIC photo on their main stage. Those with no plans for Saturday evening even got free tickets to an after party at 013 of the gypsy festival.

After our tour, we wandered around the corner to the Studio Bar where Patricia was waiting with snacks and drinks. In addition to chatting about what we had just seen and what’s going on in each other’s lives, we had a short meeting with an overview of the past TIC club year. Here are some highlights:

  • Membership is slightly down from 2015, but TIC still supports 73 expats in the area.
  • TIC has members from 22 different nationalities!
  • 1/3 of our (adult) members are employed by Tilburg University.
  • A financial report was given by Emerald, our Treasurer. One highlight worth mentioning is that while our dues revenue is down from last year, thanks to the continued subsidy from the city, we were again able to offer a wide range of events at an affordable cost to our members.
  • Thanks to Patricia’s hard  work in organizing a wide range of fun events in the past year!! A (partial) list includes: 2 excursions, 1 TICkids event, 10 socials, 6 borrels, 1 lecture, and 7 book clubs.
  • Event participation is 22.7% – up slightly from last year.
  • We are partnering more with the city and the Holland Expat Center South in organizing events.
  • Elections were needed for 4 Board positions: President, Secretary/Membership, Event Planner and IT Manager. Yolonda and Anne were re-elected, respectively, to the first 2  positions, with vacancies (due to no candidates) for the latter two. If any members are interested in helping out with some aspect of the 2 vacant positions, their contributions would be very welcome!

Visit to the SS Rotterdam

IMG_587513 June 2014

by Patricia Gonzalez

It’s amazing how far you can go on a ship that has been moored for the last ten years. On our two-hour tour, we were transported to the ‘50s and ‘60s – to days of steamship technology when transatlantic journeys were run on turbine engines and stabilizers, boilers and condensers; to glamorous evenings when women in full-skirt silhouettes and stiletto heels wended their way through mid-century modern furniture aboard La Grand Dame. And, it being the first joint outing between the Tilburg, Breda and Eindhoven clubs, we met people from different parts of the world for whom the Netherlands is the current port of call. Our group included expats from Mexico, America, Spain, Australia, Germany, Lebanon, the Philippines, even a Dutch couple originally from Tilburg who migrated as far afield as Thailand and are now back in the Randstad.

What was it about the 38,645-ton ship that so fascinated us that we signed up for the outing? Maybe the SS Rotterdam appealed to the adventurer in us. We all left the safe, comforting haven of home to make a new life in a country not our own. Perhaps the many transformations of this colossal ocean liner spoke to us. A ship that has spent 12 years as a trans-Atlantic vessel, more than 20 as a cruise ship (when long-distance commercial flights replaced sea travel), and 4 as a hotel, restaurant, museum and visitor attraction is the epitome of adaptability. We, who’ve packed up our lives, our families and careers and adjusted to initially unfamiliar cultures, know that transitions are an inevitable part of migration. They have to be welcomed, embraced. But then again, maybe what brought our group together that Saturday morning was just the allure of looking out over the water, gazing at the Rotterdam skyline, sitting down to lunch on a sunny poolside deck or snacking on high tea petit fours, with the added convenience of being transported from our city to the Rotterdam port and back again.

Some journeys take you great distances. Others, like this one, are only a city or two away. But both can make you question how far you’ve come and appreciate where you are now.

 

Schouwburg Tour

Schouwburg 124 March 2013

by Emerald Busser
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Thanks to TIC, we had a relaxed and fun tour of the Schouwburg theater, one of Tilburg’s attractions. Before the tour began, some of us met up at the Foyer restaurant for a light lunch.

The Foyer is inside the Schouwburg building and it’s an elegant and cosy restaurant with a very modern interior.

After lunch we

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