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News Archive

tícMovie Night – The French Dispatch

by Katie Schweitzer

Tilburg International Club Movie Night11 Nov 2021. For our Friday night movie, we chose a film full of well known actors that looked absurd and funny – The French Dispatch. The clip looked pretty absurd at any rate 😉

The French Dispatch is a classic Wes Anderson movie (apparently, I’ve only seen one other one) about “The French Dispatch,” a newspaper based in France which circulates in Kansas, USA, bringing foreign culture, events, and perspective to a place that otherwise would have no exposure to them.

The core of the film was focused on three distinct short stories, which were featured in that very newspaper. A notable group of famous stars played roles big and small.

(more…)

#FBF tícMovie Night: The Gentlemen review

Tonight we’ll meet up for another tícMovie Night. For #FlashbackFriday, here’s a look back at the Cinecitta movie “The Gentlemen”!

by Anne van Oorschot

5 Jun 2020. After weeks of event cancellations, it was with great enthusiasm that I heard movie theaters could reopen on June 1st. 🙂

Pathé was careful to stick to the required 1.5 meter distance and we were assigned seats individually as we entered the theater. We sat in pairs with 3 seats and 2 rows separating guests. The Gentlemen, a combination gangster/shoot-em-up and comedy film, was a good choice and just what we needed. (more…)

#FBF: tícMovie Night – Blinded by the Light

Tilburg International Club Expat Movie ClubNext week we’ll meet up for another tícMovie Night.  For #FlashbackFriday, here’s a look back at the Cinecitta movie “Blinded by the Light”!

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by Dietrich Haas

27 September 2019. For September’s tíc movie night, we were all “Blinded by the Light” at Cinecitta.

Without spoiling too much for those who still want to watch this film about the impact of “The Boss” Bruce Springsteen’s music has on a Pakistani teenager living in England, I give it two thumbs up! (more…)

#FBF: Boys in the Boat book review

boys-in-the-boat

Next week we will be meeting for our next book club; a gathering that sometimes has intense debates, but is always a lot of fun. For #FlashBackFriday, let’s take a look at a book club review from 2016!

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by Anne van Oorschot

27 Sept 2016. The first meeting of tíc readers starting with chatting about summer vacations (and the first debate of the US Presidential election!) and then we settled down to talk about The Boys in the Boat.  This non-fiction book, written by Daniel James Brown (not to be confused with the Dan Brown of The Divinci Code) is about the 8 man rowing shell from University of Washington that went on to become the US’s Olympic entry in the controversial 1936 Berlin Olympics – Hitler’s Olympics!

The story is told mainly from (more…)

#TBT: tícMovie Night: Loving Vincent

Tomorrow night we’ll meet up for another tícMovie Night.  For #ThrowbackThursday, here’s a look back at the Cinecitta movie “Loving Vincent”!

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by Yolonda van Riel

27 Oct 2017. Loving Vincent was chosen for October’s movie night. A nice group gathered, all curious about what to expect from this film. There was actually quite a bit of discussion before it even started. “How in the world can they make a decent movie using paintings?” “ I wonder if it will have a cartoon feel?” “I’m sure I’ll either love it or hate it!” (more…)

#TBT Movie: The Light Between Oceans

light-between-oceans-1Next week we’ll meet up for another Movie Night.  For #ThrowbackThursday, here’s a look back at the Cinecitta movie “The Light Between Oceans”!

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11 November 2016. by Anne van Oorschot. We had our first #TilburgInternationalClub movie evening of the club year at Cinecitta to see the film The Light Between Oceans. This beautiful film is based on the debut novel by M. L. Stedman and tells the story of Tom (Michael Fassbender), a Lighthouse keeper in Western Australia and his wife, Isabel (Alicia Vikander). Tom, a WWI veteran, is damaged by the atrocities he has seen as a soldier and feels his past will prevent him from having a happy future, so accepts the job of lighthouse keeper on a desolate island. He is surprised by the affection of Isobel, a lovely girl who lives on the mainland and they are married and head off to the island where they create a solitary, yet happy life together. (more…)

Review tícMovie Night – Blinded by the Light

27 September 2019. by Dietrich Haas.  For September’s tíc movie night, we were all “Blinded by the Light” at Cinecitta.

Without spoiling too much for those who still want to watch this film about the impact of “The Boss” Bruce Springsteen’s music has on a Pakistani teenager living in England, I give it two thumbs up!

(more…)

#TBT tícMovie Night: Green Book

This coming Friday night we’ll meet up for our first Movie Night of the club season.  For #ThrowbackThursday, here’s a look back to last year’s movie night to see “Green Book”!

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01.02.2019. Review by Elaine Ferguson. The film is loosely based on the friendship between Tony “Lip” Vallelonga (Viggo Mortensen) who is a night club owner/bouncer and Dr Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali) a talented black concert pianist. (more…)

tícMovie Night – Three Identical Strangers

Review by Anne van Oorschot.

31 May 2019. For our last movie night of the year, tíc members met to see a documentary for the first time, but it sometimes seemed much more like fiction! Three Identical Strangers tells the true story of identical American triplets, born in New York in 1961 to an unwed mother and given up for adoption via a reputable agency that specialized in placing Jewish children with Jewish families. The boys were adopted as six-month-old infants by separate families, unaware that each child had brothers.

It was discovered quite by accident when Bobby enrolled in a local Junior College and everyone seemed to know him, and called him Eddy. When he and Eddy met, both said it was like looking in the mirror. A journalist wrote about the reconnected twins and a third sibling, David, recognized himself in the accompanying photo – thus at the age of 19, the triplets met. Not only were they physically identical, they had similar mannerisms and discovered many shared interests. They became an overnight sensation appearing on many television talk shows and being written about in numerous magazines. They became inseparable, renting an apartment together in New York and doing everything together…but then things started to get a bit strange.

Their parents were furious not to have been told their adopted sons were part of identical triplets. While the agency originally told them they had separated the boys out of fears that no one would want to adopt triplets, another story slowly came to light. The separations were done as part of an undisclosed scientific “nature versus nurture” twin study, to track the development of genetically identical siblings raised in differing circumstances. The study was conceived of, and run by, renowned psychiatrist Dr. Neubauer, an Austrian Jew who had fled to America to avoid the Holocaust.

The separated triplets (and twins) were intensely studied in their homes for years, doing a barrage of tests to determine their development. Those carrying out the tests on the boys knew each had 2 identical siblings, but could not let their subjects know. The triplets opened a restaurant in New York — Triplets — selling Eastern European fare and had a ball in the early days, but eventually tempers began to fray as arguments flared over work responsibilities. Eventually, all three struggled with mental health issues for years. The Scientific study was never published. The triplets as well as other twins are – to this day – unable to look at the results.

Needless to say, we had plenty to discuss after the movie! All 6 of us liked the movie, which touched on a lot of human questions and relationships, and enjoyed the surprise element. It had a remarkable number of plot twists for a documentary! We all thought it was so strange that a Jewish doctor who had escaped the Holocaust would carry out experiments similar to those done in Concentration camps. Our discussion brought to light the fact that there was a lot of unethical research (Stanford prison, Milgram) carried out in this period.

After talking about the film for a while, we drifted into other topics: politics, the horrors of Trump, house renovations, the challenges of being vegetarian, getting an education, and how much fun the tícNic is. While everyone who came to the film has a very busy life, all agreed that a night out at the movies with tíc was a fun way to spend a Friday evening!

#TilburgInternationalclub #Expatlife #movienight #threeidenticalstrangers #Cinecitta

#TBT: tícMovie review of The Post

Tomorrow night we’ll meet up for another Movie Night.  For #ThrowbackThursday, here’s a look back 2018 Cinecitta movie “The Post”!

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Review by Anne van Oorschot. tíc members met at the Cinecitta to see the Oscar nominated film, The Post. The film, staring Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks, tells the story of The Washington Post’s decision to publish information from a top secret study regarding the United States’ political and military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. The report chronicled the U.S. government’s involvement in Vietnam’s affairs – indirectly or directly – by Presidents Truman, Eisenhower and Kennedy. The report demonstrated, among other things, that the Johnson Administration “systematically lied, not only to the public but also to Congress”. Needless to say, the government of then President Nixon, was not happy with the leaks and tried to prevent publication. Happily, The Washington Post persevered! Little could they have imagined the stories and stature they gained from a “little break-in” of the Watergate hotel only 1 year later.

As we sat in the cozy and crowded bar area of the Cinecitta after the film, we talked about the important role the press played in 1971. With so much talk of “fake news” and “alternative facts” today – certainly in America! – the role of the press seems to have been rather marginalized.  What has changed over the years? While there is no one answer, it was noteworthy to see that part of the dilemma “should we publicize?” in the film was due to the recent public sale of The Washington Post shares. A strong and almost winning argument against publication was that the investors would not like it. If it caused shareholders to sell their shares, the result would be financial disaster for the cash-strapped paper. Strong leadership in 1971 on the part of The Post’s majority owner Katherine Graham and Editor Ben Bradlee, resulted in publication, but it was a very close call.  Can the same be said anno 2018…?
#TilburgInternationalClub #Expatlife #Cinecitta #movienight #thepost

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