Tilburg International Club

Home » Posts tagged 'English'

Tag Archives: English

Upcoming Events

  • tícMovie Night 28 February 2020
  • Tour of LocHal & WWII Expo 7 March 2020
  • Borrel at Havana 20 March 2020
  • Book Club: Weather 23 March 2020
  • tícMovie Night 3 April 2020
  • Liberation Day Tour of Tilburg 5 May 2020

Enter your email address and receive notifications of new articles by email.

News Archive

Book Review: The Lost Girls of Paris

by Yolonda van Riel

08 Jan 2020. We had a small but enthusiastic group for book club as we gathered to discuss The Lost Girls of Paris by Pam Jenoff. The story centered around a curious, young widow named Grace who finds an abandoned briefcase in Grand Central Station right after WWII. She removed photos taken of 10 young women from the case and began a quest to find out the story behind the photographs.

Each chapter of the book (more…)

Book Review: Becoming

review by Renata Kenda

21 Oct. 2019. It was a rainy autumn evening, when we gathered to discuss our latest book “Becoming” by Michelle Obama. We had a fruitful discussion while enjoying the drinks and tasty nibbles next to a warm fireplace.

All of us joining this book club session liked the book, even those, who were not very in favor of

(more…)

Book review: Slaughterhouse 5

by Anne van Oorschot

3 Sept 2019. Our first gathering of the Book Club took place on September 4th – very early in the club year and prior to the tíc Welcome Event. That may explain why we were quite a small group, including 1 brand new member. We had all read the book – not hard since we’d had the entire summer and it was quite a short story.

As a young man and a prisoner of war, Kurt Vonnegut witnessed the 1945 US fire-bombing of Dresden in Germany, which reduced the once beautiful city to rubble and claimed the lives of thousands of its citizens. This atrocious act was (more…)

Book review: Where’d You Go, Bernadette?

1 May 2019. Reviewed by Anita James. The book is a deceptively easy and amusing read about a brilliant and creative architect, Bernadette, who suffers recurring traumas from the wanton destruction of her revolutionary architectural creation, the move to an alien city, and after repeated miscarriages, the dangerous surgeries on the infant that was finally born.

One can get PTSD for less, and indeed Bernadette shuts out the world except for her immediate family, and then devotes her life to raising her daughter, Bee. Bee is a bright child who sees in her mother not an eccentric woman on the verge of a nervous breakdown, but a fun and magical creature who will always have her back, and would never ever abandon her.

On this basic story line an unconventional and quirky book is developed. It is told in a multitude of voices through mediums from emails, letters, narration, phone calls and even secretarial and hospital bills.

Yet the author nevertheless keeps the tale flowing, guiding it through a bewildering number of topics:  brilliance, creativity, eccentricity, high tech, Microsoft, agoraphobia, misanthropy, architecture, Russian mafia, Antarctica, psychiatric care, modern parenting, American education, snobbery, Seattle, Canadians, family relationships and even self-help groups such as the amazing VaV – Victims against Victimhood, not to mention adultery and leaking roofs.

After a hyperactive beginning, Bernadette disappears but Bee absolutely refuses to accept the vanishing and after assiduous detective work goes all the way to the South Pole to find her mother.

And there she is, happily involved in the challenges of polar architecture. Creativity, her raison d’etre restored, she can face life again and Bee gets her eccentric family back together. Kudos for Maria Semple for a vertiginous ride brought to a safe end.
#bookclub #tilburginternationalclub #expatlife #WheredYouGoBernadette

Book Club review: Educated: A Memoir

Review by Anne van Oorschot

19 Mar 2019. For our March book club gathering, after getting a warm drink, we settled around a crackling fireplace and with a tray of yummy snacks. While not everyone had finished the book, Educated, all agreed that it was a remarkable story and well written.
Tara was the youngest of 7 children and her childhood looked idylic on the surface – living on a breathtakingly beautiful mountain in rural Idaho with her own goats and horses. Her mother was a midwife and herbalist and Tara spent a lot of hours walking on the mountain, gathering rose hips and mullein flowers that her Mom could stew into tinctures.

(more…)

Book Club review: Maybe Tomorrow

review by Anne van Oorschot

13 Feb 2019. Even though the weather outside was cold, the atmosphere at Book Club was warm and friendly. We were welcomed into the beautiful home of one of our members and offered warm drinks and tasty Valentine treats! 🙂

We had a lively discussion of Maybe Tomorrow by Boori Monty Pryor and Meme McDonald and compared its descriptions of the Australian Aboriginal’s plight to the discriminated minorities in other countries. While many shocking things were done to Australia’s indigenous population in the past, harder to understand are the many injustices and predjudices they still face. A good book, but hard to think it portrays a positive future…

 

.

#bookclub #Tilburg #tilburginternationalclub #expatlife #MaybeTomorrow

Book Club: Review of Gabriela, Clove and Cinnamon

14 Jan 2019. Reviewed by Anita James. This book is a favorite of mine and I hoped to share it more widely but whether because of the season or because nobody liked it – we ended up with a small intimate group (any more intimate and we could have held it cozily in bed with baby, Eleanor! (note: Those could/could not attend who read the book, highly recommend it! It is an easy read and a great story so do keep it on your “to read” list 🙂

Gabriela the woman-child glides through the Brazilian town of Ilheus, capital of cacao country, at a time of profound change. The gun slinging ‘colonels’ who carved out plantations have had their day and modernity is here, with roads, street lights, bus services, a real port and even an elevator at the hotel…. No longer can a ‘colonel’ kill his wife and her lover and be a hero, nor can the old timers shoot their way to winning an election.

Jorge Amado serves up a rollicking historical tale, poking gentle fun at the bombast of small town notables, at eccentric inhabitants, at immigrants and migrants, and at the love story of two of those, enmeshed in the transition roiling all around them.

Luckily Ilheus sorts itself out, as does the love of Gabriela and Nacib, after finally getting over their ill-advised and unfortunate marriage. Again is Gabriela a happy cook, Nacib naps after a delicious lunch and they meet for torrid nights in the back servant room.”

 

#bookclub #Tilburg #tilburginternationalclub #expatlife #GabrielaCloveCinnamon

Book Club Review: We All Began As Strangers

review by Melissa Donders

12 November 2018. After reading the book, We All Begin As Strangers by Harriet Cummings, an interesting discussion was had at tíc’s Book Club. The book was set in a small village in England where the inhabitants were frightened when small items in their homes would be moved around, or things went missing. Slightly based on a true story, the book followed the lives of different characters and how the intruder, whom they dubbed ‘The Fox’, impacted their life.

Discussing how and if we would notice if something had been moved around in our own homes, most of us agreed we would assume it was another person who we live with and not be worried.

We also discussed the similarities of ourselves, living in a country where we have moved for work or love, compared to one of the characters who had moved from her hometown of London to live with her new husband in this small village, which led onto discussion of how we all came to be living here in the Netherlands.

Overall, a lovely night was had, swapping well read books, saying farewell to one of our members and getting to know some new members.

 

#bookclub #Tilburg #tilburginternationalclub #expatlife #WeAllBeganAsStrangers

Book Club review: Boys in the Boat

boys-in-the-boatby Anne van Oorschot

27 Sept 2016. The first meeting of tíc readers starting with chatting about summer vacations (and the first debate of the US Presidential election!) and then we settled down to talk about The Boys in the Boat.  This non-fiction book, written by Daniel James Brown (not to be confused with the Dan Brown of The Divinci Code) is about the 8 man rowing shell from University of Washington that went on to become the US’s Olympic entry in the controversial 1936 Berlin Olympics – Hitler’s Olympics!

The story is told mainly from (more…)

%d bloggers like this: